Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign event, Saturday, April 2, 2016, in Eau Claire, Wis. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign event, Saturday, April 2, 2016, in Eau Claire, Wis. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Remember when Hillary Clinton had her initial press conference about her email? She was adamant in saying that she had neither sent or received any classified materials on her private email account.

As the inspector general started to go through her emails, it was noted that she did indeed send and receive classified materials. That is when her language changed. Suddenly, she was saying she had never sent or received any emails “marked” as classified.

This is the Clinton way. As able attorneys both Bill and Hillary Clinton are able to use language to their advantage. Word parsing, semantics and pedantry are a way of life for them. Bill Clinton gets away with easier than Hillary because he is the far superior politician. You almost want to believe him when he says such things where as with Hillary, it just screams “Bullsh*t!”

The most recent example are Hillary Clinton’s claims of her private email usage being allowed, thereby not doing a thing wrong by using a private email address hosted on a server inside her home.

A year ago, Hillary Clinton said the use of private email was perfectly within the rules and that it was “undisputed.”

Recently, she has said unequivocally, that “it was allowed” for her to use a private email address exclusively for work and to have her own server.

But in an interview with Wolf Blitzer, her language changed. Suddenly. When Blitzer pressed her on what she did, she replied, “I thought it was allowed.”

Thought it was allowed.

Not allowed. Not allowed and undisputed.

Thought it was allowed. 

This is going to be the new narrative going forward. She will no longer adamantly say it was allowed. The inspector general report makes that claim impossible because they directly stated it was not allowed and the answer would have been an unequivocal, “No” had she actually bothered to ask. 

So now we will be treated to a bunch of gobbledygook that will center around the, “I felt it was better to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission.”

That can work at times but not when it comes to national security and classified information.

Drip. Drip. Drip.